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Raw queries

Prisma Client supports the option of sending raw queries to your database. You may wish to use raw queries if:

  • you want to run a heavily optimized query
  • you require a feature that Prisma Client does not yet support (please consider raising an issue)

Raw queries are available for all relational databases Prisma ORM supports. In addition, from version 3.9.0 raw queries are supported in MongoDB. For more details, see the relevant sections:

Raw queries with relational databases

For relational databases, Prisma Client exposes four methods that allow you to send raw queries. You can use:

  • $queryRaw to return actual records (for example, using SELECT).
  • $executeRaw to return a count of affected rows (for example, after an UPDATE or DELETE).
  • $queryRawUnsafe to return actual records (for example, using SELECT) using a raw string.
  • $executeRawUnsafe to return a count of affected rows (for example, after an UPDATE or DELETE) using a raw string.

The methods with "Unsafe" in the name are a lot more flexible but are at significant risk of making your code vulnerable to SQL injection.

The other two methods are safe to use with a simple template tag, no string building, and no concatenation. However, caution is required for more complex use cases as it is still possible to introduce SQL injection if these methods are used in certain ways. For more details, see the SQL injection prevention section below.

Note: All methods in the above list can only run one query at a time. You cannot append a second query - for example, calling any of them with select 1; select 2; will not work.

$queryRaw

$queryRaw returns actual database records. For example, the following SELECT query returns all fields for each record in the User table:

const result = await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT * FROM User`

The method is implemented as a tagged template, which allows you to pass a template literal where you can easily insert your variables. In turn, Prisma Client creates prepared statements that are safe from SQL injections:

const email = '[email protected]'
const result = await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT * FROM User WHERE email = ${email}`

You can also use the Prisma.sql helper, in fact, the $queryRaw method will only accept a template string or the Prisma.sql helper:

const email = '[email protected]'
const result = await prisma.$queryRaw(
Prisma.sql`SELECT * FROM User WHERE email = ${email}`
)
warning

If you use string building to incorporate untrusted input into queries passed to this method, then you open up the possibility for SQL injection attacks. SQL injection attacks can expose your data to modification or deletion. The prefered mechanism would be to include the text of the query at the point that you run this method. For more information on this risk and also examples of how to prevent it, see the SQL injection prevention section below.

Considerations

Be aware that:

  • Template variables cannot be used inside SQL string literals. For example, the following query would not work:

    const name = 'Bob'
    await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT 'My name is ${name}';`

    Instead, you can either pass the whole string as a variable, or use string concatenation:

    const name = 'My name is Bob'
    await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT ${name};`
    const name = 'Bob'
    await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT 'My name is ' || ${name};`
  • Template variables can only be used for data values (such as email in the example above). Variables cannot be used for identifiers such as column names, table names or database names, or for SQL keywords. For example, the following two queries would not work:

    const myTable = 'user'
    await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT * FROM ${myTable};`
    const ordering = 'desc'
    await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT * FROM Table ORDER BY ${ordering};`
  • Prisma maps any database values returned by $queryRaw and $queryRawUnsafe to their corresponding JavaScript types. Learn more.

  • $queryRaw does not support dynamic table names in PostgreSQL databases. Learn more

Return type

$queryRaw returns an array. Each object corresponds to a database record:

[
{ id: 1, email: '[email protected]', name: 'Emelie' },
{ id: 2, email: '[email protected]', name: 'Yin' },
]

You can also type the results of $queryRaw.

Signature

$queryRaw<T = unknown>(query: TemplateStringsArray | Prisma.Sql, ...values: any[]): PrismaPromise<T>;

Typing $queryRaw results

PrismaPromise<T> uses a generic type parameter T. You can determine the type of T when you invoke the $queryRaw method. In the following example, $queryRaw returns User[]:

// import the generated `User` type from the `@prisma/client` module
import { User } from '@prisma/client'

const result = await prisma.$queryRaw<User[]>`SELECT * FROM User`
// result is of type: `User[]`

Note: If you do not provide a type, $queryRaw defaults to unknown.

If you are selecting specific fields of the model or want to include relations, refer to the documentation about leveraging Prisma Client's generated types if you want to make sure that the results are properly typed.

Type caveats when using raw SQL

When you type the results of $queryRaw, the raw data might not always match the suggested TypeScript type. For example, the following Prisma model includes a Boolean field named published:

model Post {
id Int @id @default(autoincrement())
published Boolean @default(false)
title String
content String?
}

The following query returns all posts. It then prints out the value of the published field for each Post:

const result = await prisma.$queryRaw<Post[]>`SELECT * FROM Post`

result.forEach((x) => {
console.log(x.published)
})

For regular CRUD queries, the Prisma Client query engine standardizes the return type for all databases. Using the raw queries does not. If the database provider is MySQL, the returned values are 1 or 0. However, if the database provider is PostgreSQL, the values are true or false.

Note: Prisma sends JavaScript integers to PostgreSQL as INT8. This might conflict with your user-defined functions that accept only INT4 as input. If you use $queryRaw in conjunction with a PostgreSQL database, update the input types to INT8, or cast your query parameters to INT4.

Dynamic table names in PostgreSQL

It is not possible to interpolate table names. This means that you cannot use dynamic table names with $queryRaw. Instead, you must use $queryRawUnsafe, as follows:

let userTable = 'User'
let result = await prisma.$queryRawUnsafe(`SELECT * FROM ${userTable}`)

Note that if you use $queryRawUnsafe in conjunction with user inputs, you risk SQL injection attacks. Learn more.

$queryRawUnsafe

The $queryRawUnsafe method allows you to pass a raw string (or template string) to the database.

warning

If you use this method with user inputs (in other words, SELECT * FROM table WHERE columnx = ${userInput}), then you open up the possibility for SQL injection attacks. SQL injection attacks can expose your data to modification or deletion.

Wherever possible you should use the $queryRaw method instead. When used correctly $queryRaw method is significantly safer but note that the $queryRaw method can also be made vulnerable in certain circumstances. For more information, see the SQL injection prevention section below.

The following query returns all fields for each record in the User table:

// import the generated `User` type from the `@prisma/client` module
import { User } from '@prisma/client'

const result = await prisma.$queryRawUnsafe('SELECT * FROM User')

You can also run a parameterized query. The following example returns all users whose email contains the string [email protected]:

prisma.$queryRawUnsafe(
'SELECT * FROM users WHERE email = $1',
'[email protected]'
)

Note: Prisma sends JavaScript integers to PostgreSQL as INT8. This might conflict with your user-defined functions that accept only INT4 as input. If you use a parameterized $queryRawUnsafe query in conjunction with a PostgreSQL database, update the input types to INT8, or cast your query parameters to INT4.

For more details on using parameterized queries, see the parameterized queries section below.

Signature

$queryRawUnsafe<T = unknown>(query: string, ...values: any[]): PrismaPromise<T>;

$executeRaw

$executeRaw returns the number of rows affected by a database operation, such as UPDATE or DELETE. This function does not return database records. The following query updates records in the database and returns a count of the number of records that were updated:

const result: number =
await prisma.$executeRaw`UPDATE User SET active = true WHERE emailValidated = true`

The method is implemented as a tagged template, which allows you to pass a template literal where you can easily insert your variables. In turn, Prisma Client creates prepared statements that are safe from SQL injections:

const emailValidated = true
const active = true

const result: number =
await prisma.$executeRaw`UPDATE User SET active = ${active} WHERE emailValidated = ${emailValidated};`
warning

If you use string building to incorporate untrusted input into queries passed to this method, then you open up the possibility for SQL injection attacks. SQL injection attacks can expose your data to modification or deletion. The prefered mechanism would be to include the text of the query at the point that you run this method. For more information on this risk and also examples of how to prevent it, see the SQL injection prevention section below.

Considerations

Be aware that:

  • $executeRaw does not support multiple queries in a single string (for example, ALTER TABLE and CREATE TABLE together).

  • Prisma Client submits prepared statements, and prepared statements only allow a subset of SQL statements. For example, START TRANSACTION is not permitted. You can learn more about the syntax that MySQL allows in Prepared Statements here.

  • PREPARE does not support ALTER - see the workaround.

  • Template variables cannot be used inside SQL string literals. For example, the following query would not work:

    const name = 'Bob'
    await prisma.$queryRaw`UPDATE user SET greeting = 'My name is ${name}';`

    Instead, you can either pass the whole string as a variable, or use string concatenation:

    const name = 'My name is Bob'
    await prisma.$queryRaw`UPDATE user SET greeting = ${name};`
    const name = 'Bob'
    await prisma.$queryRaw`UPDATE user SET greeting = 'My name is ' || ${name};`
  • Template variables can only be used for data values (such as email in the example above). Variables cannot be used for identifiers such as column names, table names or database names, or for SQL keywords. For example, the following two queries would not work:

    const myTable = 'user'
    await prisma.$queryRaw`UPDATE ${myTable} SET active = true;`
    const ordering = 'desc'
    await prisma.$queryRaw`UPDATE User SET active = true ORDER BY ${desc};`

Return type

$executeRaw returns a number.

Signature

$executeRaw<T = unknown>(query: TemplateStringsArray | Prisma.Sql, ...values: any[]): PrismaPromise<number>;

$executeRawUnsafe

The $executeRawUnsafe method allows you to pass a raw string (or template string) to the database. Like $executeRaw, it does not return database records, but returns the number of rows affected.

warning

If you use this method with user inputs (in other words, SELECT * FROM table WHERE columnx = ${userInput}), then you open up the possibility for SQL injection attacks. SQL injection attacks can expose your data to modification or deletion.

Wherever possible you should use the $executeRaw method instead. When used correctly $executeRaw method is significantly safer but note that the $executeRaw method can also be made vulnerable in certain circumstances. For more information, see the SQL injection prevention section below.

The following example uses a template string to update records in the database. It then returns a count of the number of records that were updated:

const emailValidated = true
const active = true

const result = await prisma.$executeRawUnsafe(
`UPDATE User SET active = ${active} WHERE emailValidated = ${emailValidated}`
)

The same can be written as a parameterized query:

const result = prisma.$executeRawUnsafe(
'UPDATE User SET active = $1 WHERE emailValidated = $2',
'[email protected]',
true
)

For more details on using parameterized queries, see the parameterized queries section below.

Signature

$executeRawUnsafe<T = unknown>(query: string, ...values: any[]): PrismaPromise<number>;

Raw query type mapping

Prisma maps any database values returned by $queryRaw and $queryRawUnsafeto their corresponding JavaScript types. This behavior is the same as for regular Prisma query methods like findMany.

info

Feature availability:

  • In v3.14.x and v3.15.x, raw query type mapping was available with the preview feature improvedQueryRaw. We made raw query type mapping Generally Available in version 4.0.0, so you do not need to use improvedQueryRaw in version 4.0.0 or later.
  • Before version 4.0.0, raw query type mapping was not available for SQLite.

As an example, take a raw query that selects columns with BigInt, Bytes, Decimal and Date types from a table:

const result =
await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT bigint, bytes, decimal, date FROM "Table";`

console.log(result)
Show CLI results

In the result object, the database values have been mapped to the corresponding JavaScript types.

The following table shows the conversion between types used in the database and the JavaScript type returned by the raw query:

Database typeJavaScript type
TextString
32-bit integerNumber
Floating point numberNumber
Double precision numberNumber
64-bit integerBigInt
Decimal / numericDecimal
BytesBuffer
JsonObject
DateTimeDate
DateDate
TimeDate
UuidString
XmlString

Note that the exact name for each database type will vary between databases – for example, the boolean type is known as boolean in PostgreSQL and STRING in CockroachDB. See the Scalar types reference for full details of type names for each database.

PostgreSQL typecasting fixes

Prisma ORM resolves a number of issues with typecasting in PostgreSQL.

info

Feature availability: In v3.14.x and v3.15.x, these PostgreSQL fixes were available with the preview feature improvedQueryRaw. We made these fixes Generally Available in version 4.0.0, so you do not need to use improvedQueryRaw in version 4.0.0 or later.

For example, the following raw query now works correctly, returning an integer result:

await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT ${1.5}::int as int`

// Before: db error: ERROR: incorrect binary data format in bind parameter 1
// After: [{ int: 2 }]

A consequence of this fix is that some subtle implicit casts are now handled more strictly, so some queries that previously were allowed will now fail. As an example, take the following query using PostgreSQL's LENGTH function, which only accepts the text type as an input:

await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT LENGTH(${42});`

Before version 4.0.0, Prisma ORM silently coerces 42 to text. From version 4.0.0, the query returns an error:

// ERROR: function length(integer) does not exist
// HINT: No function matches the given name and argument types. You might need to add explicit type casts.

The fix in this case is to explicitly cast 42 to the text type:

await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT LENGTH(${42}::text);`

Transactions

In 2.10.0 and later, you can use .$executeRaw() and .$queryRaw() inside a transaction.

Using variables

$executeRaw and $queryRaw are implemented as tagged templates. Tagged templates are the recommended way to use variables with raw SQL in the Prisma Client.

The following example includes a placeholder named ${userId}:

const userId = 42
const result = await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT * FROM User WHERE id = ${userId};`

✔ Benefits of using the tagged template versions of $queryRaw and $executeRaw include:

  • Prisma Client escapes all variables.
  • Tagged templates are database-agnostic - you do not need to remember if variables should be written as $1 (PostgreSQL) or ? (MySQL).
  • SQL Template Tag give you access to useful helpers.
  • Embedded, named variables are easier to read.

Note: You cannot pass a table or column name into a tagged template placeholder. For example, you cannot SELECT ? and pass in * or id, name based on some condition.

Tagged template helpers

Prisma Client specifically uses SQL Template Tag, which exposes a number of helpers. For example, the following query uses join() to pass in a list of IDs:

import { Prisma } from '@prisma/client'

const ids = [1, 3, 5, 10, 20]
const result =
await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT * FROM User WHERE id IN (${Prisma.join(ids)})`

The following example uses the empty and sql helpers to change the query depending on whether userName is empty:

import { Prisma } from '@prisma/client'

const userName = ''
const result = await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT * FROM User ${
userName ? Prisma.sql`WHERE name = ${userName}` : Prisma.empty // Cannot use "" or NULL here!
}`

ALTER limitation (PostgreSQL)

PostgreSQL does not support using ALTER in a prepared statement, which means that the following queries will not work:

await prisma.$executeRaw`ALTER USER prisma WITH PASSWORD "${password}"`
await prisma.$executeRaw(
Prisma.sql`ALTER USER prisma WITH PASSWORD "${password}"`
)

You can use the following query, but be aware that this is potentially unsafe as ${password} is not escaped:

await prisma.$executeRawUnsafe('ALTER USER prisma WITH PASSWORD "$1"', password})

Unsupported types

Unsupported types need to be cast to Prisma Client supported types before using them in $queryRaw or $queryRawUnsafe. For example, take the following model, which has a location field with an Unsupported type:

model Country {
location Unsupported("point")?
}

The following query on the unsupported field will not work:

await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT location FROM Country;`

Instead, cast Unsupported fields to any supported Prisma Client type, if your Unsupported column supports the cast.

The most common type you may want to cast your Unsupported column to is String. For example, on PostgreSQL, this would map to the text type:

await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT location::text FROM Country;`

The database will thus provide a String representation of your data which Prisma Client supports.

For details of supported Prisma types, see the Prisma connector overview for the relevant database.

SQL injection prevention

The ideal way to avoid SQL injection in Prisma Client is to use the ORM models to perform queries wherever possible.

Where this is not possible and raw queries are required, Prisma Client provides various raw methods, but it is important to use these methods safely.

This section will provide various examples of using these methods safely and unsafely. You can test these examples in the Prisma Playground.

In $queryRaw and $executeRaw

Simple, safe use of $queryRaw and $executeRaw

These methods can mitigate the risk of SQL injection by escaping all variables when you use tagged templates and sends all queries as prepared statements.

$queryRaw`...` // Tagged template
$executeRaw`...` // Tagged template

The following example is safe ✅ from SQL Injection:

const inputString = `'Sarah' UNION SELECT id, title FROM "Post"`
const result =
await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT id, name FROM "User" WHERE name = ${inputString}`

console.log(result)

Unsafe use of $queryRaw and $executeRaw

However, it is also possible to use these methods in unsafe ways.

One way is by artificially generating a tagged template that unsafely concatenates user input.

The following example is vulnerable ❌ to SQL Injection:

// Unsafely generate query text
const inputString = `'Sarah' UNION SELECT id, title FROM "Post"` // SQL Injection
const query = `SELECT id, name FROM "User" WHERE name = ${inputString}`

// Version for Typescript
const stringsArray: any = [...[query]]

// Version for Javascript
const stringsArray = [...[query]]

// Use the `raw` property to impersonate a tagged template
stringsArray.raw = [query]

// Use queryRaw
const result = await prisma.$queryRaw(stringsArray)
console.log(result)

Another way to make these methods vulnerable is misuse of the Prisma.raw function.

The following examples are all vulnerable ❌ to SQL Injection:

const inputString = `'Sarah' UNION SELECT id, title FROM "Post"`
const result =
await prisma.$queryRaw`SELECT id, name FROM "User" WHERE name = ${Prisma.raw(
inputString
)}`
console.log(result)
const inputString = `'Sarah' UNION SELECT id, title FROM "Post"`
const result = await prisma.$queryRaw(
Prisma.raw(`SELECT id, name FROM "User" WHERE name = ${inputString}`)
)
console.log(result)
const inputString = `'Sarah' UNION SELECT id, title FROM "Post"`
const query = Prisma.raw(
`SELECT id, name FROM "User" WHERE name = ${inputString}`
)
const result = await prisma.$queryRaw(query)
console.log(result)

Safely using $queryRaw and $executeRaw in more complex scenarios

Building raw queries separate to query execution

If you want to build your raw queries elsewhere or separate to your parameters you will need to use one of the following methods.

In this example, the sql helper method is used to build the query text by safely including the variable. It is safe ✅ from SQL Injection:

// inputString can be untrusted input
const inputString = `'Sarah' UNION SELECT id, title FROM "Post"`

// Safe if the text query below is completely trusted content
const query = Prisma.sql`SELECT id, name FROM "User" WHERE name = ${inputString}`

const result = await prisma.$queryRaw(query)
console.log(result)

In this example which is safe ✅ from SQL Injection, the sql helper method is used to build the query text including a parameter marker for the input value. Each variable is represented by a marker symbol (? for mySQL, $1, $2, and so on for PostgreSQL). Note that the examples just show PostgreSQL queries.

// Version for Typescript
const query: any

// Version for Javascript
const query

// Safe if the text query below is completely trusted content
query = Prisma.sql`SELECT id, name FROM "User" WHERE name = $1`

// inputString can be untrusted input
const inputString = `'Sarah' UNION SELECT id, title FROM "Post"`
query.values = [inputString]

const result = await prisma.$queryRaw(query)
console.log(result)

Note: PostgreSQL variables are represented by $1, etc

Building raw queries elsewhere or in stages

If you want to build your raw queries somewhere other than where the query is executed, the ideal way to do this is to create an Sql object from the segments of your query and pass it the parameter value.

In the following example we have two variables to parameterize. The example is safe ✅ from SQL Injection as long as the query strings being passed to Prisma.sql only contain trusted content:

// Example is safe if the text query below is completely trusted content
const query1 = `SELECT id, name FROM "User" WHERE name = ` // The first parameter would be inserted after this string
const query2 = ` OR name = ` // The second parameter would be inserted after this string

const inputString1 = "Fred"
const inputString2 = `'Sarah' UNION SELECT id, title FROM "Post"`

const query = Prisma.sql([query1, query2, ""], inputString1, inputString2)
const result = await prisma.$queryRaw(query);
console.log(result);

Note: Notice that the string array being passed as the first parameter Prisma.sql needs to have an empty string at the end as the sql function expects one more query segment than the number of parameters.

If you want to build your raw queries into one large string, this is still possible but requires some care as it is uses the potentially dangerous Prisma.raw method. You also need to build your query using the correct parameter markers for your database as Prisma won't be able to provide markers for the relevant database as it usually is.

The following example is safe ✅ from SQL Injection as long as the query strings being passed to Prisma.raw only contain trusted content:

// Version for Typescript
const query: any

// Version for Javascript
const query

// Example is safe if the text query below is completely trusted content
const query1 = `SELECT id, name FROM "User" `
const query2 = `WHERE name = $1 `

query = Prisma.raw(`${query1}${query2}`)

// inputString can be untrusted input
const inputString = `'Sarah' UNION SELECT id, title FROM "Post"`
query.values = [inputString]

const result = await prisma.$queryRaw(query)
console.log(result)

In $queryRawUnsafe and $executeRawUnsafe

Using $queryRawUnsafe and $executeRawUnsafe unsafely

If you cannot use tagged templates, you can instead use $queryRawUnsafe or $executeRawUnsafe but be aware that your these functions make it much more likely that your code will be vulnerable to SQL injection.

The following example concatenates query and inputString. Prisma Client ❌ cannot escape inputString in this example, which makes it vulnerable to SQL injection:

const inputString = '"Sarah" UNION SELECT id, title, content FROM Post' // SQL Injection
const query = 'SELECT id, name, email FROM User WHERE name = ' + inputString
const result = await prisma.$queryRawUnsafe(query)

console.log(result)

Parameterized queries

As an alternative to tagged templates, $queryRawUnsafe supports standard parameterized queries where each variable is represented by a symbol (? for mySQL, $1, $2, and so on for PostgreSQL). Note that the examples just show PostgreSQL queries.

The following example is safe ✅ from SQL Injection:

const userName = 'Sarah'
const email = '[email protected]'
const result = await prisma.$queryRawUnsafe(
'SELECT * FROM User WHERE (name = $1 OR email = $2)',
userName,
email
)

Note: PostgreSQL variables are represented by $1 and $2

As with tagged templates, Prisma Client escapes all variables when they are provided in this way.

Note: You cannot pass a table or column name as a variable into a parameterized query. For example, you cannot SELECT ? and pass in * or id, name based on some condition.

Parameterized PostgreSQL ILIKE query

When you use ILIKE, the % wildcard character(s) should be included in the variable itself, not the query (string). This example is safe ✅ from SQL Injection.

const userName = 'Sarah'
const emailFragment = 'prisma.io'
const result = await prisma.$queryRawUnsafe(
'SELECT * FROM "User" WHERE (name = $1 OR email ILIKE $2)',
userName,
`%${emailFragment}`
)

Note: Using %$2 as an argument would not work

Raw queries with MongoDB

For MongoDB in versions 3.9.0 and later, Prisma Client exposes three methods that allow you to send raw queries. You can use:

  • $runCommandRaw to run a command against the database
  • <model>.findRaw to find zero or more documents that match the filter.
  • <model>.aggregateRaw to perform aggregation operations on a collection.

$runCommandRaw

$runCommandRaw runs a raw MongoDB command against the database. As input, it accepts all MongoDB database commands, with the following exceptions:

When you use $runCommandRaw to run a MongoDB database command, note the following:

  • The object that you pass when you invoke $runCommandRaw must follow the syntax of the MongoDB database command.
  • You must connect to the database with an appropriate role for the MongoDB database command.

In the following example, a query inserts two records with the same _id. This bypasses normal document validation.

prisma.$runCommandRaw({
insert: 'Pets',
bypassDocumentValidation: true,
documents: [
{
_id: 1,
name: 'Felinecitas',
type: 'Cat',
breed: 'Russian Blue',
age: 12,
},
{
_id: 1,
name: 'Nao Nao',
type: 'Dog',
breed: 'Chow Chow',
age: 2,
},
],
})
warning

Do not use $runCommandRaw for queries which contain the "find" or "aggregate" commands, because you might be unable to fetch all data. This is because MongoDB returns a cursor that is attached to your MongoDB session, and you might not hit the same MongoDB session every time. For these queries, you should use the specialised findRaw and aggregateRaw methods instead.

Return type

$runCommandRaw returns a JSON object whose shape depends on the inputs.

Signature

$runCommandRaw(command: InputJsonObject): PrismaPromise<JsonObject>;

findRaw

<model>.findRaw returns actual database records. It will find zero or more documents that match the filter on the User collection:

const result = await prisma.user.findRaw({
filter: { age: { $gt: 25 } },
options: { projection: { _id: false } },
})

Return type

<model>.findRaw returns a JSON object whose shape depends on the inputs.

Signature

<model>.findRaw(args?: {filter?: InputJsonObject, options?: InputJsonObject}): PrismaPromise<JsonObject>;
  • filter: The query predicate filter. If unspecified, then all documents in the collection will match the predicate.

  • options: Additional options to pass to the find command.

aggregateRaw

<model>.aggregateRaw returns aggregated database records. It will perform aggregation operations on the User collection:

const result = await prisma.user.aggregateRaw({
pipeline: [
{ $match: { status: 'registered' } },
{ $group: { _id: '$country', total: { $sum: 1 } } },
],
})

Return type

<model>.aggregateRaw returns a JSON object whose shape depends on the inputs.

Signature

<model>.aggregateRaw(args?: {pipeline?: InputJsonObject[], options?: InputJsonObject}): PrismaPromise<JsonObject>;